No, no, no!

In his guest-post, for which I thank him, Maxime St-Hilaire offers three critiques of the judgments that have upheld the constitutionality of Justice Mainville’s appointment to the Québec Court of Appeal ― that of the Québec Court of Appeal in Renvoi sur l’article 98 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1867 (Dans l’affaire du), 2014 QCCA 2365, and that of the Supreme Court in Quebec (Attorney General) v. Canada (Attorney General), 2015 SCC 22. None of these critiques persuade me.

* * *

The first is that the two Courts were wrong to consider that the words “from the bar of [Québec],” which, in section 98 of the Constitution Act, 1867, define the pool of eligible appointees to the province’s superior courts, can ― as a purely textual matter ― extend to former members of the bar. This conclusion rests on an absence of any textual indication that the link with the bar must be current in the text (such as can, according to the Supreme Court’s majority’s opinion in l’Affaire Nadon, Reference re Supreme Court Act, ss. 5 and 62014 SCC 21, [2014] 1 S.C.R. 433, be inferred from the wording and interplay of ss. 5 and 6 of the Supreme Court Act). For prof. St-Hilaire, however, this conclusion is both “counter-intuitive” (my translation, here and throughout) and “arbitrary because it makes that which is specific and contingent into something general and essential.”

I simply do not see how this is the case. As Sébastien Grammond, who (brilliantly) represented the Canadian Association of Provincial Court Judges, pointed out at the Supreme Court hearing, one can be “from” somewhere even if one has not lived there for a long time. (And, I would add, even if one has moved any number of times since having lived there.) Similarly, one can meaningfully say that a federal court judge appointed from the Barreau du Québec is still “from” that bar ― as opposed to some other one ― after he or she has held judicial office for many years. At the very least the interpretation that imposes no temporal constraint is just as plausible as the one that does. In my view, it is actually more so.

* * *

Prof. St-Hilaire’s second critique is historical. Actually, it consists of two distinct claims. The first is that, contrary to what the Québec Court of Appeal (and implicitly the Supreme Court) concluded, the concerns that motivated the enactment of s. 98 were the same that, later, motivated the enactment of what would eventually become s. 6 of the Supreme Court Act ― and, therefore, that the reasoning of the Supreme Court’s majority in l’Affaire Nadon is applicable to l’Affaire Mainville as well.

Actually, I think that it is easy to see that, while in a very general sense these two provisions were indeed motivated by the same concern for the integrity of Québec’s civil law, the precise problems they were intended to solve were quite different. If they hadn’t been, the Supreme Court would have been created in 1867, along with the rest of the federal institutions. The additional problem that prevented this from happening was that a majority of the Supreme Court’s judges were obviously going to be non-Québeckers, and s. 98 could not apply. The guarantee of representation in s. 6 of the Supreme Court Act was the solution to this specific problem ― that of creating a national court which, despite mostly consisting of judges from common law provinces, would nonetheless be acceptable to Québec. This specific context was key to the Supreme Court’s reading of s. 6 in l’Affaire Nadon. The Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court were right to conclude that it made that case’s holding inapposite in interpreting s. 98.

The second part of Prof. St-Hilaire’s historical critique has to do with the meaning of the expression “from the bar” in 1867. Prof. St-Hilaire points to the statutory provisions regulating the appointment of judges to Québec’s courts before confederation, which he says “obviously” must inform the interpretation of s. 98. In his view, these provisions, of which he traces the history in great detail, only allowed the appointment of then-practicing lawyers to the Superior Court, and of the judges of that particular court as well as of then-practicing lawyers to the Court of Queen’s Bench, which since became the Court of Appeal. That is right, so far as it goes, at least with respect to the Court of Queen’s Bench (though I am not quite sure about the Superior Court). But, as those who supported the constitutionality of Justice Mainville’s appointment have always argued, s. 98 was drafted differently from these provisions. The models to which prof. St-Hilaire points were available, and yet they were not followed. So it is far from “obvious” that these provisions must or even can serve as guides for the interpretation of s. 98. Rather, the choice ― quite clearly the deliberate choice ― of a different wording, one that made no mention of the currency of bar membership or courts where the appointee may have served prior to appointment under s. 98 suggest that these conditions cannot be read into that provision.

And then, one must ask a broader question about the value of an originalist interpretation such the one prof. St-Hilaire offers, even one that is about original public meaning and not about original intent (on which Québec’s submissions in l’Affaire Mainville focused). Prof St-Hilaire simply assumes that originalism is an appropriate approach to this case, but that too is far from obvious. In particular, the federal courts, and federal court judges appointed to that office because of their membership in the Québec bar, such as Justice Mainville, simply did not exist in 1867. So to conclude that the original meaning of s. 98 would not have included such judges is not to say much of anything about whether that provision should be understood as allowing their appointment in 2015.

* * *

Prof. St-Hilaire describes his third and final objection as a “practical” one. He argues that allowing the appointment of a judge of the federal courts to Québec’s superior courts makes it possible “to do indirectly what one cannot do directly” ― that is to say, to subsequently appoint such a judge to one of Québec’s seats on the Supreme Court, contrary to the majority opinion in l’Affaire Nadon. This claim suffers from two major difficulties.

The first is that the majority in l’Affaire Nadon did not say that a former judge of the federal courts can never be appointed to the Supreme Court. On the contrary, the majority specifically pointed out that it did “not address” the question of whether such judge “who was a former advocate of at least 10 years standing at the Quebec bar could rejoin the Quebec bar for a day in order to be eligible for appointment to this Court under s. 6” [71] ― much less that of a judge served on one of Québec’s courts for some substantial period of time. The majority’s express refusal to address the issue is hardly warrant for inferring that the Court decided it in a specific way.

Second, prof St-Hilaire’s endorsement of the “practical objection” is unjustifiably selective. As I pointed out here, the same objection could be raised against the appointment, under s. 98, of persons who resigned their membership in the Québec bar in order to become judges of the provincial court. They too cannot be appointed directly to the Supreme Court pursuant to s. 6 of the Supreme Court Act, and yet become eligible for such an appointment if they are elevated to the Superior Court or Court of Appeal. Yet, like the Québec government, prof. St-Hilaire says that such appointments should be possible. Québec argued that that was because judges of the provincial court were members of a “legal institution of Québec,” while judges of the federal courts were not. It was a weak argument, given the federal courts’ involvement with Québec and its legal system, but at least it sounded in principle. Prof. St-Hilaire, for his part, simply says it is a “much better compromise between law and facts” (meaning the longstanding practice of such appointments, in Québec and elsewhere) than the interpretation retained by both the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court. Yet, again as the federal government and others have always argued, this concession to constitutional practice is quite untethered from the text of s. 98, which does not distinguish between former lawyers appointed to provincial courts and former lawyers appointed to federal courts.

Undeterred, prof. St-Hilaire doubles down and suggests that the same approach “could and should indeed have been applied (mutatis mutandis, of course) to the interpretation of” section 97 of the Constitution Act, 1867.” Yet apart from, once again, the lack of any foundation in the text of s. 97, this interpretation would have led to the curious result that, while eligible under s. 5 of the Supreme Court Act to represent the province from which they were originally appointed to the federal courts at the Supreme Court (something the Supreme Court unanimously confirmed in l’Affare Nadon), federal court judges could not be appointed to that province’s own courts under s. 97. Then again, under prof. St-Hilaire’s and Québec’s interpretation, the judges of the Supreme Court itself, no matter what their previous affiliation, would not be eligible to be appointed to Québec’s courts under s. 98. Québec’s lawyer did his best to laugh this question away when it was put to him at the hearing at the Supreme Court and, when pressed, utterly failed to answer. I do not think that, had he been in that lawyer’s place, prof. St-Hilaire would have succeeded either.

* * *

Prof St-Hilaire undertook to convince us that, despite the absence of any indication to that effect in the text of that provision, s. 98 is best interpreted as preventing some, but not all, former lawyers from being appointed to Québec’s Superior Court and Court of Appeal. I do not think that his arguments are persuasive. At most, it seems to me that an interpretation of s. 98 that would bar the appointment of all (not just some) former lawyers was textually plausible, though no more, and probably less, compelling than the alternative, allowing the appointment of such lawyers.

And even if textually plausible, such a restrictive interpretation was practically undesirable. Everyone agreed, I believe, that Justice Mainville would make a fine judge of the Québec Court of Appeal. Had he been appointed directly to that court, the appointment would likely have been met with universal approval. Has his service at the Federal Court and Federal Court of Appeal made him a worse jurist? Of course not. And so it seems to me that an interpretation that would prevent the appointment of eminently qualified judges so as to assuage the fears that long-dead men might or might not have felt had some time traveller told them about the federal courts is not to be lightly favoured. The Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court were right not to fall into that trap.

As for whether the Supreme Court really has “repudiated” its opinion in l’Affaire Nadon, as prof. St-Hilaire suggests, I do not think we can quite say that. Again, there are real differences between the provisions at issue there and in l’Affaire Mainville, and just as the resolution of the former does not dictate that of the latter, so we cannot infer from the latter anything about the former. Still, we may indeed conclude that the Court views the statutory interpretation holding of l’Affaire Nadon as confined to its own specific facts, and not in need of being extended. That is good news indeed.

3 thoughts on “No, no, no!

  1. Yes, yes, yes! Il m’apparaît relativement facile de répliquer à cette réponse de mon ami et hôte M. Sirota.

    (YES! No. 1) ARGUMENT DE TEXTE. La réponse de M. Sirota rate sa cible, n’atteste pas bonne compréhension de ce qui était mon objection, mais ne fait plutôt, pour l’essentiel, que répéter ce qui faisait l’objet de mon objection. C’est sans doute de ma faute toutefois, n’ayant manifestement pas réussi à bien me faire comprendre. Mon objection allait comme suit :

    1. En 1867, “from the bar” devait être compris à la lumière des lois du Canada-Uni en vigueur et transitoirement maintenues. Celles-ci parlaient de la catégorie d’avocats, par opposition à celle de juges de tribunaux précisément indiqués. Cela excluait donc celle de juges d’un tribunal non indiqué. À la suite de l’évolution de l’organisation judiciaire, la seule catégorie de juges qui demeurait en 1867 était celle de juges de la cour supérieure, qui pouvaient être nommés à la Cour du banc de la Reine.

    2. En 1886, la Loi sur la Cour suprême introduit, pour les candidats à la charge de juge de cette cour, une distinction entre la catégorie de seuls avocats actuels (à l’exclusion des anciens avocats) et celle d’avocats anciens ou actuels. Tout comme Paul Daly, le PGC, de nombreux autres intervenants, la Cour d’appel et la CSC, M. Sirota fût très tôt d’avis qu’une telle distinction était pertinente pour comprendre le sens de l’expression “from the bar” à l’article 98 LC 1867. Il s’agit ici d’une pétition de principe. Cette pertinence n’avait rien d’évident, mais devait être démontrée. La loi (à l’époque ordinaire) postérieure et relative à d’autres nominations judiciaires vient faire une distinction que ne fait pas la loi constitutionnelle. Soit. Mais encore? En quoi cela devait-il rétroagir sur le sens à donner à la loi constitutionnelle? On ne démontre pas en quoi une distinction introduite dans une loi (à l’époque ordinaire) de 1886 serait pertinente pour déterminer le sens d’une disposition constitutionnelle de 1867. Plus encore, alors que, par comparaison (si jamais c’était pertinent) avec la loi de 1886, l’absence d’une distinction dans la loi de 1867 pourrait très bien être interprétée dans deux sens différents, M. Sirota (comme les autres) “décrète”, pour ainsi dire, que, si en 1886 on distingue entre la catégorie de “seuls avocats actuels” et celle d'”avocats anciens ou actuels”, cela veut forcément dire que, 19 ans auparavant, concernant d’autres nominations judiciaires, dans une loi constitutionnelle, l’expression “from de bar” voulait forcément correspondre à une catégorie équivalente à cette dernière, comme si ce qui était nouveau en 1886 concernant les nominations à la Cour suprême était évidemment la catégorie de seuls avocats actuels, et ne pouvait évidemment pas être (concernant les nominations des juges autres que québécois) celle d'”avocats (non seulement actuels mais aussi) anciens”. Il est même un argument allant en sens inverse pour suggérer que, en 1886, c’était justement plutôt cette dernière catégorie qui était nouvelle. Il s’agit du par. 21 de l’avis de la CSC dans l’affaire du juge Nadon, où la majorité a conclu que, en vertu de la loi antérieure sur la CSC, celle de 1875, “seules les personnes étant avocats au moment de leur nomination pouvaient être nommées à la Cour, tant pour le Québec que pour le reste du pays”. Deuxième pétition de principe de la part de M. Sirota, donc.

    (YES! No. 2) ARGUMENT HISTORIQUE. Le fait que le contexte historique tende à me donner raison en favorisant du reste le sens naturel des mots ressort déjà de ce qui précède. De toute façon, sur ce plan encore une fois, M. Sirota ne fait que répéter l’objet de mon objection plutôt d’y répondre de manière à faire avancer la discussion. La seule exception – outre l’argument d’un juge de la CSC qu’on voudrait nommer à la Cour d’appel ou (pourquoi pas tant qu’à y être?) supérieure d’une province (cas que je ferais ressortir à un débat constructif se situant sur le plan de l’interprétation pratique plutôt qu’à un argument historique, ce qu’il n’est pas) – est que, de manière un peu facile, M. Sirota me reproche mon “originalisme”. Toutefois, il n’est pas en mesure de le faire. Voici pourquoi.

    Il est certes possible de s’écarter du contexte historique dès lors que, sur d’autres plans, on a de bons arguments. En l’occurrence, non seulement le sens ordinaire des mots milite en faveur de ma thèse, mais, sur le plan de l’économie des dispositions (argument de texte), la double pétition de principe (dont l’une est anachronique) de M. Sirota et des nombreux autres dont il partage l’opinion établit au contraire que le sens naturel des mots est ici confirmé par la prise en compte du contexte historique. Un minimum de connaissance et de rigueur historiques confirme sans l’ombre d’un doute que la logique qui a présidé au contingent de juges québécois à la Cour suprême du Canada n’était que le prolongement de celle qui a présidé à l’adoption de l’article 98 LC 1867, qui lui-même ne faisait que codifier constitutionnellement des acquis des lois du Canada-Uni relatives aux principaux tribunaux judiciaires québécois. M. Sirota me paraît concéder cela. Qui plus est, il n’avait guère d’autre choix, à mon avis, que de concéder que mon analyse des lois pertinentes du Canada-Uni était juste. S’il y avait eu place à interprétation ici, je l’aurais admis.

    Au demeurant, preuve de mon non-originalisme est ma prise en compte de l’argument pratique ou pragmatique, par laquelle je concédais qu’il fallait faire une entorse partielle à l’histoire pour composer avec de nombreuses nominations de juges des cours provinciales aux cours de compétence supérieure au Québec comme dans d’autres provinces.

    Une autre objection à la critique d’originalisme que me fait M. Sirota est que, bien compris, l’originalisme n’est pas tout à fait la prise en compte de ce que le constituant de l’époque a voulu dire (car ensuite on peut faire varier le degré de généralité de ses propos), mais plutôt de s’en tenir à ce qu’il a voulu précisément, dans le détail, faire (Ronald M. DWORKIN, «The Moral Reading of the Constitution» dans The New York Review of Books (21 mars 1996): «We turn to history to answer the question of what [the framers] intended to say, not the different question of what other intentions they had. […] Originalism insists that it means what they expected their language to do […]»).

    (YES! No. 3) ARGUMENT PRATIQUE (OU PRAGMATIQUE). La première réponse de M. Sirota consiste ici à dire que, puisque la CSC ne s’est pas prononcée sur la constitutionnalité d’un moyen indirect de nommer à la CSC, comme juge du Québec, un juge d’une cour fédérale, il fallait en déduire, soit qu’elle était délibérément disposée à cautionner procédé du genre (comme elle vient de le faire avec son avis dans l’affaire du juge Mainville), soit que, ne l’ayant pas explicitement interdit (en ne se prononçant pas), il devenait impossible à un juriste de mobiliser un principe général de droit selon lequel on n’est pas censé pouvoir faire indirectement ce qu’il est interdit de faire directement. Ainsi mise au jour, cette réponse est encore manifestement arbitraire, sophistique, bref, anémique.

    La deuxième réponse de M. Sirota, m’accusant d’être “injustifiablement sélectif”, consiste à modifier le cadre précis de mon intervention sur ce plan, en oubliant que le choix que je défends ici se veut le meilleur compromis, non seulement avec le moyen choisi par le constituant dans la poursuite de l’objectif de l’article 98 LC 1867, mais aussi avec l’avis de la CSC dans l’affaire Nadon. Or mon débatteur vient tout juste, dans sa première réponse, d’interpréter autrement cet avis, de sorte que cette soi-disant deuxième réponse dépend complètement de la première.

    Concernant “the curious result” de mon interprétation “that, while eligible under s. 5 of the Supreme Court Act to represent the province from which they were originally appointed to the federal courts at the Supreme Court (something the Supreme Court unanimously confirmed in l’Affare Nadon), federal court judges could not be appointed to that province’s own courts under s. 97. Ma réplique est que, contrairement aux juges qui y “représentent” le Québec, il n’est pas du tout évident que les autres juges de la CSC y représentent une province donnée. Souvenons-nous d’ailleurs du projet consigné à l’article 94 LC 1867, et de la nature transitoire qui devait être celle de l’article 97 LC 1867. Mais même si on devait ne pas être d’accord avec moi sur ce point, j’aurais encore, je crois, quelque chose à répondre de manière subsidiaire. Si rien n’interdisait au législateur fédéral, avant la constitutionnalisation, en 1982, de la composition de la CSC, de rendre éligibles, pour les juges des provinces autres que le Québec, les anciens avocats (ce qui devait comprendre les juges fédéraux), rien ne l’obligeait à le faire. Il aurait bien pu, dans un esprit davantage compatible avec l’article 97 LC 1867 (si on ne partage pas l’interprétation que je viens d’en donner), s’en tenir aux avocats actuels et juges des cours de compétence supérieure de la province “représentée” par le juge en question. C’est ainsi que, entre la loi ordinaire inconstitutionnelle et la loi ordinaire qui met le mieux en oeuvre l’esprit de la constitution, se trouve parfois la loi ordinaire constitutionnelle mais non idéale, dont l’existence n’est en rien un guide pour l’interprétation de la loi constitutionnelle et un argument de constitutionnalité d’une autre loi.

    Dans un élan d’assurance, M. Sirota va même jusqu’à présumer du fait que j’aurais été pour ainsi dire mis en boîte par les juges de la CSC si j’avais été à la place de l’avocat de la PGQ. Il écrit en effet: “Then again, under prof. St-Hilaire’s and Québec’s interpretation, the judges of the Supreme Court itself, no matter what their previous affiliation, would not be eligible to be appointed to Québec’s courts under s. 98. Québec’s lawyer did his best to laugh this question away when it was put to him at the hearing at the Supreme Court and, when pressed, utterly failed to answer. I do not think that, had he been in that lawyer’s place, prof. St-Hilaire would have succeeded either.” Je ne sais pas ce que M. Sirota veut ici dire exactement par “to succeed”. S’il veut dire “remporter sa cause”, alors je le laisse seul faire dans le “réalisme juridique” imaginaire et prédire le résultat d’une plaidoirie de ma part qui n’aura jamais eu lieu. Si, en revanche, il veut dire “avoir quelque chose de sensé à répondre”, alors voici ma proposition. J’aurais répondu que, si l’on me suit sur la thèse selon laquelle la représentation du Québec à la Cour suprême répond au développement de la même logique que celle qui préside à l’article 98 LC 1867 (et corrélativement l’article 97), alors, compte tenu du fait qu’il est d’autant compréhensible que le constituant de 1867 n’ait pas prévu le cas inusité d’un juge de la CSC qui redescendrait d’un ou deux échelons dans la hiérarchie judiciaire qu’une telle cour n’était pas encore créée mais la seule compétence fédérale de ce faire prévue, et compte tenu aussi de l’avis relatif à la nomination du juge Nadon, qui s’explique par la constitutionnalisation, en 1982, de la composition de la CSC, il était facile de ma part d’admettre qu’on fasse une exception au texte des articles 97 et 98 en faveur des juges de la CSC. Cela serait d’autant compréhensible que, alors que la CSC vient, en les couronnant, s’intégrer au système judiciaire de chacune des provinces, cela n’est pas du tout le cas des cours fédérales qui forment, de manière exceptionnelle au principe selon lequel le système judiciaire de chacune des provinces applique aussi bien le droit fédéral que le droit provincial, un système parallèle.

    • 1. Does the ordinary meaning of the word “from” actually include an element of contemporaneity, contrary to prof. Grammond’s objection? You do not answer.

      2. Pre-confederation laws were quite explicit in requiring immediate pre-appointment bar membership (more so, in fact, than the Supreme Court Act); s. 98 is silent on the matter. Doesn’t that have any significance? You do not answer.

      3. Doesn’t the fact that the Supreme Court has a majority of non-Québec judges and that the Québec judges are expected to representatives matter when considering the context of the Supreme Court and its similarity to or difference from s. 98? You do not answer.

      4. How appropriate is it to rely on originalism in this matter, considering the non-existence of the federal courts and the Supreme Court in 1867? Your invocation of Dworkin’s peculiar brand of “originalism” notwithstanding, you do not answer,

      5. Why should we think that an interpretation riddled with exceptions that have no foundation in the constitutional text is better than one that is “clean” and consistent with the text? I do not think you really answer that, either.

  2. 1. Je crois avoir répondu à cette question depuis mon premier billet sur le sujet. J’ai depuis lors toujours soutenu qu’il était contre-intuitif d’interpréter le mot autrement. La Cour d’appel concède d’ailleurs qu’une première lecture suggère cela, et que c’est seulement en allant au-delà du sens ordinaire des mots que celui qui nous occupe peut vouloir dire qu’on “vient” d’un barreau comme on vient d’un pays (ou d’une province). Ma réponse est donc: oui.

    2. Faux. Je réponds que si l’article 98 LC 1867 se lit de manière différente (en l’occurrence plus générale), c’est qu’il était clair pour tout le monde, comme je l’ai expliqué, qu’il renvoyait généralement de manière implicite à ces lois préconfédératives, qui d’ailleurs devaient être maintenues en vigueur transitoirement. Il n’est pas étonnant qu’une disposition constitutionnelle (qui en plus préserve des acquis de la loi ordinaire antérieure) se lise en termes plus généraux. Donc, pour répondre à ta question une fois de plus: je soutenais que cette différence n’était pas signifiante, mais que, comme je l’ai très clairement soutenu dans mon billet, je crois, “from the bar” devait se comprendre à la lumière du mot “avocat” (par opposition à juge de tribunaux précisément désignés) dans ces lois préconfédératives.

    3. Je ne suis pas sûr de voir où tu veux en venir. L’exception à 97 et 98 LC 1867 que j’avais en tête en faveur des juges de la CSC exigerait que, parmi ces derniers, seuls les juges du Québec puissent être “retrogradés” à la CS ou la CAQ du Québec. Quant aux autres juges de la CSC (qui à mon avis n’y représentent pas une province), ils devraient, afin de pouvoir être nommés à la CS ou la CA d’une province (autre que le Québec), avoir, du moins, été déjà admis au barreau de cette province.

    4. Comme je récuse ta critique d’originalisme pour des raisons que j’ai déjà données et qui vont au-delà de ma référence à Dworkin, je considère que je n’ai pas à répondre à cette question.

    5. Si ta solution “propre” et admise par le texte est celle qui consiste à interpréter “from the bar” comme tu soutiens qu’il faut le faire et donc différemment de moi, alors ta question n’en est pas une qui m’est adressée, mais est une question rhétorique qui tient pour acquis le bien-fondé de ta position sur des points dont nous avons déjà débattu. Si par contre cette solution “propre” et admise par le texte est celle qui consiste à ne pas prévoir d’exception en faveur des juges de la CSC, alors ma réponse est celle que j’ai déjà donnée. N’étant pas “originaliste” comme tu m’en accuses, je pense qu’ici, contrairement aux juges des Cour fédérales, mais à l’instar de ceux des cours provinciales, une telle exception non prévue dans le texte devrait être faite. Quelles sont ces raisons? Elle se trouvent juste au dessus, mais je veux bien les répéter : (1) “la représentation du Québec à la Cour suprême répond au développement de la même logique que celle qui préside à l’article 98 LC 1867 (et corrélativement l’article 97)” + (2) “il est d’autant compréhensible que le constituant de 1867 n’ait pas prévu le cas inusité d’un juge de la CSC qui redescendrait d’un ou deux échelons dans la hiérarchie judiciaire qu’une telle cour n’était pas encore créée mais la seule compétence fédérale de ce faire prévue” + (3) “alors que la CSC vient, en les couronnant, s’intégrer au système judiciaire de chacune des provinces, cela n’est pas du tout le cas des cours fédérales qui forment, de manière exceptionnelle au principe selon lequel le système judiciaire de chacune des provinces applique aussi bien le droit fédéral que le droit provincial, un système parallèle” + (4) “l’avis relatif à la nomination du juge Nadon”.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s