Why Codify

Apologies for my silence of late. I’m afraid blogging will be light for another week or so. In the meantime, however, here’s something related to the topic of my last post, the codification of law. It won’t be news to those versed in the history of Québec law, but it’s something that I, in my ignorance, did not know, and find interesting, fascinating even: the reasons given by the legislature of the United Province of Canada for codifying the substantive and procedural civil law of Lower Canada.

These reasons are set out in the preamble of the Act Respecting the Codification of the Laws of Lower Canada Relative to Civil Matters and Procedure, Con. St. L.C., c. 2 (available here at XXXIII). There are three of them, and while they have, in a general sense, to do with the accessibility of the law, a consideration of the foremost importance to proponents of codification such as Jeremy Bentham, they concern aspects of this problem that are quite different from those with which Bentham was concerned. For him, codification was an opportunity to provide a statement of the law that would be both comprehensive and comprehensible to everyone (by virtue of being expressed in a concise, clear, and logical text). As I noted in my last post, the drafters of the French civil code knew that such ambitions for codification were not realistic. For them, codification was a means of realizing some political objectives ― notably national unity and the consecration of a certain (conservative) mindset. (I plan on returning to this issue eventually.) But the Canadian codification pursued other aims again.

The first “whereas” of the preamble notes that much of Lower Canada’s civil law being French, and some of it being English, “it therefore happens, that the great body of the Laws in that division of the Province exist only in a language which is not the mother tongue of the inhabitants thereof of British origin while other portions of it are not to be found in the mother tongue of those of French origin.” Codification was thus presented, first, as an opportunity to make all the laws accessible to the speakers of both languages. It was, in a way, the continuation in Lower Canada of efforts begun in England with the Pleading in English Act, 1362, 36 Edw. III c. 15, which provided that court procedures would thenceforth be in English, rather than, as before, “in the French Tongue, which is much unknown in the … Realm,” and continued with the Proceedings in the Courts of Justice Act, 1731, which also complained of the “many and great Mischiefs [which] do frequently happen to the Subjects of this Kingdom, from the Proceedings in Courts of Justice being in an unknown Language.” These linguistic concerns are also reflected in the first section of the Codification Act, which required that of the two Secretaries to the Commissioners for Codifying the Laws of Lower Canada one “be a person whose mother tongue is English but who is well versed in the French language, and the other a person whose mother tongue is French but who is well versed in the English language.”

The second “whereas” of the preamble, for its part, referred to the increasing difficulty of obtaining copies of the old French laws “still in force in Lower Canada,” as well as “commentaries upon them,” due to their “hav[ing] been altered and reduced to one general Code.” This is a practical consideration and one that is obviously peculiar to the situation of Lower Canada in the mid-19th century. But the reference to “commentaries upon” French laws as being important, perhaps even necessary, is worth noting, mostly because it stands in an interesting contrast with the hostility to legal commentary that the French codifiers saw the need to address at some length, but perhaps also in light of contemporary doubts about the value of legal scholarship. The legislators who decided on the codification of the laws of Lower Canada seem to have believed that the writings of legal commentators are as important as legal texts themselves in making the law accessible ― a belief that CanLII Connects represents in the digital age.

Finally, the the third “whereas” also referred to “the great advantages which have resulted from Codification, as well in France as the state of Louisiana, and other places” ― without elaborating on what these “great advantages” were. Codification, it was content to proclaim, was “manifestly expedient.”

As in post-revolutionary France, the circumstances of time and place seem to have provided the impetus for codification in Lower Canada. However, the reasons which (at least ostensibly) motivated Canadian legislators had more to do with the needs of the legal community ― and thus, even if indirectly, the litigants ― and universal principles than those that moved Bonaparte and his codifiers to action. Whether this difference had any substantive consequences, I am not qualified to say. But I think it is interesting to note.

One thought on “Why Codify

  1. Pingback: Why Codify (Encore) | Double Aspect

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